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Lighter Tornado Sheeting Systems

Written by Paul Raymond. Posted in Tornado Sports Tuning Guide

Tried and Tested Lighter Tornado Sheeting Systems

The Tornado Class listened closely to the test sailors at the ISAF evaluation in Santander and we are now presenting our tried and tested smart sheeting system to reduce the loads of the gennacker and mainsheet.

We were especially interested in the comments from the women in Santander and their views about how they really want to have a sporting challenge at the top level of sailing. They don't want a boat which is easy to sail, they want a challenge and a boat they have to train for.

At the helm no women had any problems and some of the Ladies were winning the practice races easily. In a matter of minutes they were familiar with the boat and brought it up to the maximum speed. They commented saying that they really noticed the difference and the high quality of the Tornado over the other boats at the evaluations.

While crewing some said it was easy with the Gennacker and Mainsheet, some others said it was too hard to handle the sheet loads. It was great to get this feedback and comments from the sailors because for us these loads are normal and we have developed techniques to handle the Tornado sheet loads.

The class believe that if a boat is too easy to handle, it’s does not deserve to be at the top sporting event the World sees. The Olympics are for the very best Athletes and it should be a sporting challenge which you should train for. Class treasurer Nahid Gaebler (Tornado crew, 44 years old, World champion) is a normal woman with no special fitness training, and she easily handles the sheet loads of the Tornado in up to 30knots of wind (see the World championship Final Day 2011). The Tornado Class have seen a dramatic rise in mixed teams since 2010 and continues to grow, 80% of these teams have female crews.

The Tornado Class take the comments of the evaluation sailors very seriously and we have been re thinking about options to face the critics. We would now like to present a tried and tested solution after discussions with our Tornado membership and technical partners Harken and Ronstan.

We propose to change the sheet from the Gennacker (which is actually direct 1:1 with two automatic ratchets) with an extra block and make it 1:2.

Also the Mainsheet (which is actually 1:8) we can change with only one extra block to 1:12.

This way we make it 50% easier on the Gennacker sheet and 33% easier on the mainsheet without having too much extra sheet length. This is also a system used by team DEN during their Olympic Campaign, the crew had a shoulder injury and was not able to handle the sheet loads.

NEW TORNADO Mainsheet System with 1:12

tornado-mainsheet-system

  • http://localhost:8080/aita.asn.au/public_html/templates/ja_purity/images/bullet.gif); line-height: 28px; background-position: 18px 8px; background-repeat: no-repeat no-repeat;">Less load. Less friction. Easy sheeting!
  • http://localhost:8080/aita.asn.au/public_html/templates/ja_purity/images/bullet.gif); line-height: 28px; background-position: 18px 8px; background-repeat: no-repeat no-repeat;">This is the mainsheet system with the lowest load to pull
  • http://localhost:8080/aita.asn.au/public_html/templates/ja_purity/images/bullet.gif); line-height: 28px; background-position: 18px 8px; background-repeat: no-repeat no-repeat;">Also this mainsheet system has the lowest friction with the 4mm Dyneema and Ronstan/Harken sheaves and blocks
  • http://localhost:8080/aita.asn.au/public_html/templates/ja_purity/images/bullet.gif); line-height: 28px; background-position: 18px 8px; background-repeat: no-repeat no-repeat;">Check the loads by hand and scale against the other normal block systems and you feel the difference
  • http://localhost:8080/aita.asn.au/public_html/templates/ja_purity/images/bullet.gif); line-height: 28px; background-position: 18px 8px; background-repeat: no-repeat no-repeat;">You can build the boom yourself. It’s easy to build and to service
  • http://localhost:8080/aita.asn.au/public_html/templates/ja_purity/images/bullet.gif); line-height: 28px; background-position: 18px 8px; background-repeat: no-repeat no-repeat;">The normal “internal boom” mainsheet system is a proven system, used for over 20 years on the Tornado!

NEW TORNADO Gennacker Sheet System 1:2

tornado-kite-system

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Tornado Sports Line Lengths

Written by Paul Raymond. Posted in Tornado Sports Tuning Guide

Tornado Sports Line Lengths

The following information has been provided by Brett Burvill from Windrush Yachts. Please note that these line lengths are sugestions only and are those used by Brett, so before you make your own using these measurements double check your own boats configuration as these dimensions may not suit your boat. If you have your own measurements that are not listed here please submit to webmaster and I will be happy to add them to this tuning guide.

Spinnaker tack line - 7.4 m. Strip 4m + 4.7m of 4mmshock cord attached in end for retriever/halvard tensioning.
Spinnaker pole bridle wires - bearing point of shackle at bow to inside of big loop out flat.
Spinnaker pole side lines - ends of bridle to near side of pole - L1-40mm (allow length to go around pole)
Spinnaker halyard - overall length- 21.5m. Strip for top 6.8m , cleat is at 7.5m and add vb cord inside for cleat (2m) To make: cut 15m of 5mm Dinghy control and slide the casing up , and add vb cord 2m, pull the core out about 20cm from the far end then slide casing over untiljust before VB cord, then taper end and tuck in above VB cord.
Spinnaker sheet - 14.5m
Jib sheet - 8.3m
Jib halyard (1.7mm)- 14.8m
Main Cunningham -
Cunningham shockcord (4mm) -
Main halyard -
Main Outhaul - 1.5m
Mainsheet (8mm section) - 11.2m (3.2 can be tapered if desired).
Mainsheet - (3mm section) - 3.3m
Main beam traveller line - 1.5m ( includes split tail)
Tramp side lashings - 2.5mm ocean 3000 - 5.2m (allowing a short tail- approx 50mm hull side to tramp when lashed tight.
Trap shock cord in front beam - 8m
Skipper shockcord - 3.8m .
Trap lines - Crew - 6.63m Skipper - 6.55m (changed both to 6.68 Aug 2011)
Trapeze dropper lines - 0.55m to the Heart and 1.0m for the adiusting part.
Mast rotation - 4.7m.

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Tornado Tuning with a Carbon Mast

Written by Paul Raymond. Posted in Tornado Sports Tuning Guide

This article was written by Rolf Nilsen and was published at www.blogspot.com

General

Mast rake: outside corner of transom

Pre-bend (carbon): Spreader tips raked so diamonds are 50 mm from luff track (less for heavy crew/lighter wind, more for lighter crew/higher wind); Diamond tension set to 38 on the new (black) Loos gauge (more for heavy wind/light crew).

Windward

Low winds: 0-7 knots
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Twist (leech telltales): Less important than leech shape. I try to keep leech near center line but not hooked above it. Then steer to get tell tales working.
Foot (distance between mainsail and boom): 2-3 inches from boom at max draft point.

Mainsail draft (leeward and windward telltales, draft position, downhaul): Depending on pre-bend, zero to small amount of downhaul, in order to open the leech and keep it from being hooked. 

Mast rotation: Mast tiller pointed at aft end of centerboard trunk opening. I mark a line on the tramp under the mast tiller (which is the mast-base type).

Jib traveler: Almost no wind, traveler is 45 cm from center line. With wind insufficient to lift hull, it is at 35 cm. 

Distance from jib leech to spreader on mast: This will depend on spreader rake, carbon or alu. Generally, an inch off the tip is OK. Touching is too much.

Jib telltales: Flowing.

What to look for in helming and trimming: Steer by jib and main tell tales. Keep weight as far forward as possible. Generally, this means helmsman at or in front of shroud, crew in front of main beam. Possibly sending crew to leeward to help raise the hull when in enough breeze. I make shroud tension higher for lighter wind (typically 25-30 on Loos gauge)...to reduce forestay sag at lower mainsheet loads. 

Medium winds: 7-15 knots 
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Twist (leech telltales): Still less important than leech shape. I try to keep leech near center line but not hooked above it. Then steer to get tell tales working.

Foot (distance between mainsail and boom): 0-1 inch from boom at max draft point.

Mainsail draft (leeward and windward telltales, position, downhaul):

Downhaul off until double trapped & no longer looking for power.

Mast rotation: Once single trapping, we crank it in to 20 cm aft of the centerboard trunk opening.

Jib traveler: 35 cm from centerline

Distance from jib leech to spreader on mast: Typically 0-1 inches.

Jib telltales: Flowing

What to look for in helming and trimming:: Keep weight forward. Steer for waves/puffs. Give crew mainsheet as soon as single trapped. Play mainsheet to keep hull out as much as wind allows. Crew should crouch in to gunwale in lulls. Keep weight forward/near shroud. After double trapping, start small increments of downhaul to smooth out gusts. Crew works mainsheet to control hull height off water. If needing to move more than 1 arm's length, start adding small amounts of downhaul. Note that going too far is bad...boat is flat, requiring excess footing to lift the hull. Easing downhaul doesn't usually work unless main is also eased. 

High winds: 15-25 knots
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Twist (leech telltales):Flicking periodically is ok

Foot (distance between mainsail and boom): 0-1 inch at max draft point. 

Mainsail draft (leeward and windward telltales, position, downhaul):

Windwards will rarely settle in higher breeze. Downhaul set according to 1 arm-length mainsheet control of gusts.

Mast rotation: 30 cm after of board trunk opening.

Jib traveler: 55 cm off centerline minimum.

Distance from jib leech to spreader on mast: 1-2 inches.

Jib telltales: Try to have them flow, but at higher winds the windwards may never settle.

What to look for in helming and trimming: Steer for swell and gusts on the water. Good communication with crew is important (ie. try to avoid overcorrecting by steering up & easing main at the same time). Some gusts will require luffing up to control the boat (try to anticipate these by looking upwind)...but try to resist luffing as a rule and let the mainsheet control hull height where possible. Once this is mastered, hull should rarely touch the water and boat will surge forward in gusts instead of pop up...quite a noticeably different feel when done right.

Downwind

General Spinaker Setup:

Luff tension/distance sprit/mast blocks: I set spin luff to a fist full able to rotate 60-90 degrees....less for light conditions, more for heavier. I do not measure block distance...this changes with mast rake, downhaul and even rotation.

Spi sheeting point: 
Light air we are at the 3rd tramp lace point. 
Med-High wind we are at 4th lacing. 
Very high winds I might try 5th.

Low winds:
Course/helming: Keep sail loosely sheeted & breathing. Steer to keep sail inflated. Crew to leeward and forward. Helmsman forward and inboard, even right at the mast. Consider helmsman taking the spin sheet for better steering/sheeting coordination, particularly in chop water with light air.

Mainsail twist: Eased to get telltales flowing...traveler might be eased off 3-6 inches in very light conditions.Usually I let off the outhaul fully.

Mast rotation: 90 degrees or more...need to stop it flopping either by holding it or running a rotation lock line of some kind.

Downhaul: Completely off...wrinkles in the main are fine.

Jib traveler: Near full outboard (~55 cm or more if possible).

Jib sheeting: Enough to take flutter out and get most tales working.

Spi sheeting: 3rd tramp lacing point until hull can raise with both crew to windward. Eased as much as possible...may need to oversheet briefly if it collapses...then ease back immediately. Steer to keep sail full.

Medium winds:
Course/helming: Keep sail a bit more sheeted but still breathing. Steer to keep sail inflated, go higher to speed up, then head back down. Aim for small changes of steering angles (~5-10 degrees) to keep speed & hull out longer. Crew to leeward until hull can fly with crew to weather. Helmsman forward at shroud. As wind picks up, helm moves aft to rear beam. Crew might trapeze off stern. Steer down in puffs as speed come up (again, only 5-10 degree angle changes to keep hull out...don't get greedy!).

Mainsail twist: More tension on sheet so that tales are flowing once at speed. Traveller centerline. Outhaul eased to get 3-4 inches of max draft at boom.

Mast rotation: Possibly still at 90 degrees, but in buoy racing, we leave it at the upwind setting since it's too easy to forget to reset for the upwind On the finish legs I will sometimes let it go.

Downhaul: Full ease.

Jib traveler: 55 cm.

Jib sheeting: Enough to take flutter out and get most tales working

Spi sheeting: 4th tramp lacing point once hull is lifting. Eased as much as possible...may need to oversheet briefly if it collapses...then ease back immediately. Steer to keep sail full.

Strong winds:
Course/helming: Head slightly higher & hold for speed to come up, then decide to go higher, hold or steer down as needed. Avoid going up until sudden take off point...you will find you overshoot and become vulnerable to gusts. Small steering inputs going down & up are key. 

Mainsail twist: Sheet tension fairly high to keep tales flowing at speed. Traveller center line. Outhaul 0-1 inches of draft.

Mast rotation: Same as upwind.

Downhaul: Same as upwind or eased back a little from that point.

Jib traveler: 55 cm or more.

Jib sheeting: Sheeted to stop flutter/tales flow.

Spi sheeting: 4th tramp lacing point is normal until very high wind. Enough tension to keep it filled as boats speed comes up. Avoid oversheeting and choking the sail. This forces helmsman to drive higher to get speed/hull up...makes boat too vulnerable to gusts. 

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This article was written by Rolf Nilsen and was published on www.blogspot.com